Thursday, January 10, 2008

FAQ'S about Fostering

What's the process?
The process is very similar to adoption. There is an application that has to be filled out, followed by a phone interview. We want to ensure that your home and lifestyle is suited to a dog. Even though fostering is temporary dog ownership it is still important that you have the time, and energy to commit.

The application form asks what types of dogs you'd be willing to foster- as we want to match up the right foster family to the right dog.
Before the dog is placed in your home he is vaccinated and vet checked. We will however ask that you take the dog to the Vet on the day of their scheduled spay/neuter surgery. He will need to be picked up after and then recieve a few days of little activity so he can recover.

What do we have to do with the dog?
Treat the dog just like your own! Love him, teach him manners, house rules and how to be a good dog! Lots of the dogs we get have either minor or major issues- from simple housetraining issues, to seperation anxiety; it will be your job to help him through his problems. We are here to offer advice aswell. Dogs need exercise and you will need to walk your foster dog at least once a day- without an outlet for his energy you will have your hands very full!
Do we have to pay for anything?
We supply the food while you are fostering and the dog will have a collar on with our information in case he gets lost. We ask that you provide treats, toys and chewies. We will send along a crate while you have the dog aswell. There is a local doggie daycare that allows us to have our rescue dogs at the daycare free of charge.

How long do we have him for?
We ask that you commit for at least two weeks- sometimes it will go longer though. We try not to keep a dog in the system for more than 5 weeks.

Do we have a say in who adopts him?
Yes- quite often the potential adopter will meet the dog for the first time while it is in your care.

Don't you get attached?
This is the number one reason why a lot of caring people do not offer their homes for foster care: they are afraid giving the dog up will hurt too much. However, it's a hard truth, but without enough foster homes, we cannot rescue and save these dogs. It helps to think of your foster dog as your friend's dog that you are keeping during a vacation. Sure, you like him and will take really good care of him, but when your friend gets home, you will give the dog back! This is a dog who ultimately belongs to someone else, who is in our care for only a short time. When you give him or her up, it will be to a 'forever home' that this dog has been waiting for--and you will be opening a space for the next rescue who needs you so desperately. There is ALWAYS another rescue dog.

Can we adopt him?
Yes! Of Course!